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Who is Anthony Davison ( Killer allowed to return home from prison for only five weeks ) Wiki, Bio, Murderer, Details, Information and More Facts

Anthony Davison

Anthony Davison Biography                                            Anthony Davison Wiki

Anthony Davison was jailed for life in 1992 for strangling his ex-partner Marie Hines, 23, at their home in Jarrow, Tyne and Wear. He was released after 27 years in prison

A murderer was granted permission to return to his hometown only five weeks after being released from jail, which angered his victim’s father.

Anthony Davison was sentenced to life in prison for killing his ex-partner Marie Hines, 23, at their home in Jarrow, Tyne and Wear in 1992.

After 27 years behind bars, he was granted parole despite resistance from Marie’s father to David, who asked to prevent Davison from returning to the northeast if he was released.

David was furious when he learned that his daughter’s killer had successfully requested a change in her parole so that she could return to Jarrow to visit her parents if they were too ill to visit them.

The parole board defended the decision, saying the change was made in consultation with professionals who work with Davison, making the exclusion zone “appropriate and proportionate.”

David, a victim rights activist, said the killer’s needs take precedence over the needs of a grieving family.

The 72-year-old said, “It makes me sick. I want him kicked out of the Northeast.”

“Why should he be able to go back to the place where he killed my daughter?”

He added: “I had to make all kinds of statements about what I wanted for the restricted areas.

“The exclusion zone was agreed upon on the condition that he be released.

“Then I was informed about 20 weeks ago on probation that he had been released and that these were his restricted areas.”

Davison attacked Marie and strangled her with a rope after their relationship ended.

He pleaded guilty to the murder and received a life sentence of at least 14 years.

David hadn’t seen Davison for almost 30 years until he was shown a recent photo of him.

He said: “The only good news is that he had aged. It didn’t look like I expected.

“But I will never forget his eyes. People’s eyes don’t change.”

David struggles with the idea that he might run into Davison on the street.

A spokesperson for the parole board said: “Licensing conditions are an extremely important part of the crime release plan, as they help the parole service control and manage crime. offender in the community.

“The parole authority cannot comment on the details of changes in the conditions of an offender’s license.

“In this case, however, large exclusion zones have been set up that are maintained taking into account the opinion of the victim’s family.

The Parole Board made its decision after receiving input from professionals involved in Mr. Davison’s management in the community who supported the request for changes to make restricted areas appropriate and proportionate.

“By law, the license conditions must be necessary and provided in all the circumstances of each case, this is the legal test that the City Council must apply.

“In determining the size or extent of a restricted area, the final decision rests with the parole board.

By law, a restricted area must not be larger than necessary to avoid unexpected contact with the victim and must not prevent the offender from obtaining support such as access to family, health or social services, or employment and education.

“This is not because offenders are preferred to victims, but because access to such support has been shown to reduce the risk of further crimes and prevent other victims from becoming victims.

“In some cases, exclusion zones may contain ‘corridors’ or ‘pathways’ that allow a perpetrator to pass through an exclusion zone to reach a destination.

“In most cases, the perpetrator is not allowed to stop anywhere on the route within the exclusion zone until he reaches the destination.

“Applications to change existing exclusion zones will be carefully considered and the Parole Board will always assess the potential impact of proposed changes on the victim.

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