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Who was Katherine Schlegel ( College student went to Electric Zoo in NYC and wound up dead ) Wiki, Bio, Age, Incident details, Family, Death Cause, Arrest, Investigation and More Facts

Katherine Schlegel

Katherine Schlegel Biography  Katherine Schlegel Wiki

Katherine Schlegel was an aspiring marine biologist from Tony New Canaan, Connecticut who loved the outdoors and was with her friends.

Katherine Schlegel Age

When Katherine Schlegel, 20, told her mother Elena in August 2018 that she had gone to the Electric Zoo music festival in Randall’s Island, “I thought nothing,” her mother recently told The Post.

“Like,” OK, she’s going to a concert for the weekend, “recalled Elena Schlegel. “And off we went – Friday morning, ‘Bye, have a great time.’

“I never saw her again,” said the mother.

What happened next to Katherine is a tragic mix of missteps and crime first described to The Post by her mother and the dogged Bronx NYPD detective who helped resolve the case.

Elena recalled struggling with school in early 2018 and decided to take a semester from the University of South Carolina to return home for a while.

Soon a friend introduced the young woman to a group of army soldiers stationed at Fort Drum in the hinterland.

That spring, Katherine went to the base military ball with one of the soldiers, a sergeant named Nick Ramshaw, and the couple started dating.

Katherine also met Ramshaw’s friend Tanner Howell, a fellow soldier stationed at the base.

Elena said she remembered not being “excited” about Katherine’s new relationship, but wasn’t too worried because she didn’t think it would last.

After a few months of dating, Katherine, Ramshaw, Howell, and a few other friends made plans to check out the Electric Zoo – a three-day electronic music carnival that is slated to culminate with a performance by mega DJ Tiesto on the Sunday before Labor Day.

On Randall’s Island off Manhattan, Howell arranged to buy 57 capsules of the drug ecstasy or Molly from two other Fort Drum soldiers who were also traveling to the festival. The prosecution was charged against him in a criminal complaint filed in federal court in Manhattan.

The soldiers – former Army Spc. Lagaria Slaughter and an unnamed man working with authorities met Katherine and one of her friends near the pocket check before the festival and handed over the drugs, the government said.

Howell then electronically transferred $ 560 to the drug dealers, according to the complaint.

“I texted her and spoke to her that afternoon, and she sent me a picture of her with another friend from New Canaan around 9:30 am,” Elena recalled. “She said she was having a good time and that was it.”

Sometime after that, when thousands of revelers in neon outfits danced on the construction site, Katherine collapsed and her limp body was carried off the site by friends and loaded into an Uber.

But instead of going to a hospital, Katherine’s friends directed the cab driver to an Airbnb in the Bronx, an “infamous” party house they rented on a coastal block in Throggs Neck, NYPD detective Anthony Russo told The Post.

“When [Katherine] got back to Airbnb, she was passed out, but she was still alive,” said Russo, an investigator for the overdose squad.

Her friends at Airbnb eventually called 911 despite actively trying to hide information from the first responders who showed up, Russo claimed.

“There has been confusion from EMS just because EMS did not get the correct information,” said Russo. “[Katherine’s friends] tried to hide what exactly happened to her and what was going on there.”

Katherine was rushed to Jacobi Medical Center and then taken to a Manhattan hospital – but she soon died.

The city medical examiner’s office later found that she had fatally overdosed on a cocktail made from drugs such as molly, cocaine, methamphetamine, amphetamine, an appetite suppressant, and Xanax.

Now it was up to Russo – spurred on by Elena – to collect what had happened and who might be responsible for the drugs.

After Katherine’s death, investigators tracked text messages linking her to Howell, Slaughter, and the nameless man who later pleaded guilty to a federal drug charge in exchange for a lighter sentence.

Investigators also searched Slaughter’s quarters and retrieved 10 capsules of Molly, 55 cans of LSD, some magic mushrooms and drug packaging materials.

Slaughter pleaded guilty to Manhattan federal court last month. He was sentenced to 15 months in prison. His lawyer did not respond to a request for comment.

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